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Lipman's

Ore and let davven.™

Mail: lippomano@gmail.com

New feature: Hover your mouse pointer over green words, and you'll see an explanation!

Monday, November 14, 2005

World Premiere

Here (click) is an unskilful unspoilt authentic recording of Mar Gavriel's tune for Pe-ullôs Eil, which is from the Djerban ritual for Maarev shelleyontef, right before half kaddesh.

The text:


פְּעֻלּוֹת אֵל מַה נּוֹרָאוֹת וְעָצְמַת יָדוֹ מָה רַבָּה
רָם עַל כָּל שְׁבָח וְהוֹדָאוֹת וְנַעֲלָה עַל כָּל מֶרְכָּבָה
גָּאׁה גָּאָה עַל נִבְרָאוֹת יוֹם שָׁת הַיָּם לְחָרָבָה
יִתְגַּדַּל עוֹשֵׂה נִּפְלָאוֹת וְיִתְקַדַּשׁ שְׁמֵיהּ רַבָּא׃

Stay tuned for the piano-accompanied version, the four-part fugue and the mobile ringtone!

10 Comments:

Blogger Steg (dos iz nit der šteg) said...

Cool!
Is that a Djerban accent? It sounds Syrian, except that the /a/s sound more [a] than [æ].

Monday, November 14, 2005 5:38:00 PM  
Blogger Mar Gavriel said...

It's a good thing that you're so careful about pronouncing daghesh Hazaq on the recording. Otherwise, be`u(l)loth el might end up sounding like something else, and the "el" in question would sound more like Zeus than Hakkozesh Borekh Hu (להבדיל).

Wednesday, November 16, 2005 11:30:00 AM  
Blogger The back of the hill said...

Tayere Lipman,


Have changed the link - please check, and let me know if this is the correct one.
Regards,

Wednesday, November 16, 2005 1:50:00 PM  
Anonymous The back of the hill said...

The tune reminds me of something, something, something.....

I've heard a very similar melody before, actually a number of similar melodies, but they're not on the ceedees I regularly play (Cajun waltzes, and lately Trafasi and Max Nijman).

Wednesday, November 16, 2005 2:26:00 PM  
Anonymous Lipman said...

I've heard a very similar melody before

I find it very original in spite of its simplicity and clarity. You could be thinking of other tunes that play around keynote, subdominant and third, like the well known Shir hamaales tune. (Funny that the most popular tune for a kabbalistic innovation is South German.) Or a very nice Mo oshiv tune I gauge to be 150 years old. Or some shlus kaddesh.

Wednesday, November 16, 2005 2:27:00 PM  
Anonymous Lipman said...

I just thought "Who on earth knows Max Nijman outside of Suriname and the NLs?", but then I remembered...

Thanks for your nice words!

(Wa'l chanukat el blawgeikum mubarak, ya sidi!)
شكرا جزيلا


I've heard a very similar melody before

I find it very original in spite of its simplicity and clarity. You could be thinking of other tunes that play around keynote, subdominant and third, like the well known Shir hamaales tune. (Funny that the most popular tune for a kabbalistic innovation is South German.) Or a very nice Mo oshiv tune I gauge to be 150 years old. Or some shlus kaddesh.

Would you mind changing the link from the direct mp3 link to my or MG's post?

Wednesday, November 16, 2005 2:29:00 PM  
Blogger The back of the hill said...

Listened again. Twixt plaintive and triumphant.

Haunting - in the sense that it stays with one.

Thursday, November 17, 2005 11:07:00 PM  
Anonymous brother kayin said...

finally listened to it. i like.

Sunday, November 20, 2005 1:40:00 PM  
Blogger Hirshel Tzig said...

Beautiful stuff. Pure, and adulterated by Pop Israeli culture.
Me want more.

Thursday, December 01, 2005 10:05:00 AM  
Blogger The back of the hill said...

Still evocative. Emotionally stimulating. Oy.

Wednesday, March 22, 2006 11:38:00 PM  

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